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Beginner Level Reading
06 Jun, 2024

All-Time-Low (ATL)

[ Awl-tahym-loh ]

All-time-lows mark the lowest asset price registered in its entire trading history, which often coincides with the first price available.

Yulia Zakharchuk
Written by
Julia Zakharchuk
Yulia Zakharchuk Julia Zakharchuk Expert Author
Julia is a professional crypto and blockchain writer known for her insightful YouTube channel "MoneyFest." She showcases her dynamic presentation skills as a host and moderator at blockchain conferences. Julia drives also business development at ChainUp and advises UNITBOX, an innovative NFT renting protocol. With her exceptional expertise, Julia is a highly valued industry contributor...
Shawn Munir
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Shawn Munir
Shawn Munir Shawn Munir Expert Author
Shawn Munir is the CEO of Coinweb.com and spearheads all the collaborative partnerships for the platform. He bought his first Bitcoin in 2017 and never looked back. He is also an investor in 200+ Web3 startups and is considered an expert in the field. Before building Coinweb with his co-founders, he co-founded Presail, a management...

What is an All-Time-Low (ATL)?

The meaning of all-time low (ATL) is the lowest price point that the crypto asset ever registered. Depending on where it appears, it can be a bearish or bullish sign.

Contrary to the ATL definition, all-time highs (ATH) represent the highest price registered for that token. Given that ATLs are very rare and ATHs are more frequent, the latter are more useful for crypto analysis.

For most cryptocurrencies, ATLs tend to match with the earliest tradeable price (also known as the Initial Coin Offering, ICO). Below is the Bitcoin ATL.

Bitcoin All-Time Low
2010 Bitcoin All-Time Low | Source: Coinmarketcap.com

In the example below, unlike Bitcoin, Luna Classic ($LUNC) reached its all-time low much later:

Luna Classic All-Time High and All-Time Low
Luna Classic All-Time High and All-Time Low | Source: Coinmarketcap.com

Understanding the Impact of All-Time Highs and Lows in Crypto

To better understand the meaning of ATL and ATH crypto, it’s worth knowing that not all tokens start from $0. Before the ICO, creators can set an initial price or run pre-sales with lower ones. For example, one of the founders of Ethereum, Vitalik Buterin, launched ETH at $0.31.

There are even airdrops like Celestia that gave away 60 million free $TIA tokens, and its ATL is the original price of $2.03.

Example of a high-ATL token ($TIA) after the airdrop
Example of a high-ATL token ($TIA) after the airdrop | Source: Coinmarketcap.com

Here’s the potential meaning of different ATHs and ATLS: 

  • Very early ATL and late ATH: This is the normal cryptocurrency price progression. Unless there’s a catastrophic incident (see $LUNC), most large coins never return to ATL prices.
  • Early ATH and ATL: This is common for new projects with low market capitalization. Whether it’s the initial excitement or automated arbitrage, many tokens tend to inflate prices on the launch day and quickly lose value over time. Whether they return or not comes down to fundamental analysis.
  • Late ATL after the ATH: This might mean a major incident is threatening the projects’ survival, especially if it’s below the earliest price. Buying this ATL can still be profitable, but in the long term, prices will likely stay around $0.

The interpretation can vary for long-term cycles:

  • In bear markets, ATLs are more likely, and ATHs can still occur on new projects. Tokens might disappear completely due to low liquidity and reappear after the bear market. In the case of ATHs, it’s recommended that they be sold early.
  • In bull markets, ATHs are frequently tested and constantly tested. ATLs are still normal for new tokens during corrections. For larger coins, however, ATLs are concerning, even associated with inactive communities, cyber-attacks, rug pulls, token migrations, and others.

Conclusion: Crypto Investing At All-Time Lows

As the lowest buying point, ATLs are useful landmarks to measure the maximum ROI possible throughout the token’s lifetime. They tend to appear in early project stages, followed by all-time highs. Finding an ATH cryptocurrency after the launch can be a buying opportunity depending on the cause.

Since projects aren’t guaranteed to recover, investing at near-zero ATLs can be a lot riskier than buying at all-time highs. Instead, investors look for entry points at relative lows, such as local resistance zones or the lowest 24-hour price.

Yulia Zakharchuk
Written by

Julia is a professional crypto and blockchain writer known for her insightful YouTube channel “MoneyFest.” She showcases her dynamic presentation skills as a host and moderator at blockchain conferences.

Julia drives also business development at ChainUp and advises UNITBOX, an innovative NFT renting protocol. With her exceptional expertise, Julia is a highly valued industry contributor and is set to make a lasting impact.

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